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NASA Biologist Measuring Climate Change With Honey Bees

Talk about the canary in the coal mine, scientist are using Honey bees to gather data on our climate. NASA Biologist Measuring Climate Change With Honey Bees has been going on since 2009.

NASA Biologist Measuring Climate Change With Honey Bees
NASA Biologist Measuring Climate Change With Honey Bees

The weather chaos in 2017 was a roller coaster ride for sure. Extended droughts in the west followed by massive wildfires, Houston and Florida hurricanes followed up with heavy snow in the north not to mention Florida's winter storms will affect those areas honey bee populations.

NASA Biologist Measuring Climate Change With Honey Bees
NASA Biologist Measuring Climate Change With Honey Bees

As of today it is unseasonably warm in Texas for Feb. This early winter warming will have it's effect on Honey Bee colonies.

When temps get to 50 Honey Bees begin to fly look for food. When they can not find it they eat their stores and the brood patch is not increased.

As a matter of fact, my associates in the south experienced low wild Honey Bee populations along with smaller than average honey stores. This is the way it was for the 2017 bee removal season.

I wanted to attribute the slow year to Zika spraying, but i'm not so sure now. In a article put out by Texas A&M extension service we read of Dr. Wayne Esaias. Read the full report at the link above.

Dr. Wayne Esaias a NASA biologist began beekeeping in 1992. It was easy for him at first but within a few years he began to experience colony losses.
Nation wide beekeepers lose about 33% of their colonies each year. And every beekeeper/scientist wants to know why.
We in the industry have found that their many factors to this enigma. From bee diseases and parasitic mites to habitat loss and AG chemicals.
Yet, now we can add climate chaos to the picture. It just seems that we are the ones that are causing all this.
Want to learn more about Dr. Wayne Esasia the NASA Biologist Measuring Climate Change With Honey Bees go to the following link.

Texas A&M Extension

 

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